Essay on watershed management

There seems to be an advantage to covering the plate with the pronator quadratus (PQ) in order to interpose the muscle between the plate and the flexor tendons. During the initial dissection, most surgeons incise the PQ distally at the edge of the muscle fibers. This line is referred to as the PQ line (see footnote 1). After plate placement, most surgeons repair the PQ muscle. However, the thinness of the fascia of the muscle makes this an exercise in futility, as the sutures typically rip out before the next layer is closed. One technique that has proven to be quite secure is to release the PQ during the original dissection not along the margin of the muscular fibers (the PQ line), but 1-2 mm beyond the PQ line, into the fibrous tissue proximal to the volar capsule. This fibrous tissue, termed the fibrous transition zone (see footnote 1), has been determined in cadaveric dissections not to be part of the mobile volar wrist capsule (comprised of the radioscaphoid, radiocapitate, long radiolunate, and short radiolunate ligaments), but to be immobile and attached to the distal margin of the radius. It is felt that incising the fibrous transition zone should not add unnecessarily to wrist capsular scarring or wrist joint stiffness. Continue the dissection radially 1-2 mm into the fibrous tissue at the base of the first dorsal compartment. If this is done, there will be a 1-2 mm thick, strong margin along the edge of the PQ muscle. This margin will securely hold the sutures and the PQ will remain in place, serving as an interpositional layer between the plate and the flexor tendons.

The same "let's have it both ways" opportunism infects his treatment of another very serious subject, namely domestic counterterrorist policy. From being accused of overlooking too many warnings—not exactly an original point—the administration is now lavishly taunted for issuing too many. (Would there not have been "fear" if the harbingers of 9/11 had been taken seriously?) We are shown some American civilians who have had absurd encounters with idiotic "security" staff. (Have you ever met anyone who can't tell such a story?) Then we are immediately shown underfunded police departments that don't have the means or the manpower to do any stop-and-search: a power suddenly demanded by Moore on their behalf that we know by definition would at least lead to some ridiculous interrogations. Finally, Moore complains that there isn't enough intrusion and confiscation at airports and says that it is appalling that every air traveler is not forcibly relieved of all matches and lighters. (Cue mood music for sinister influence of Big Tobacco.) So—he wants even more pocket-rummaging by airport officials? Uh, no, not exactly. But by this stage, who's counting? Moore is having it three ways and asserting everything and nothing. Again—simply not serious.

In addition, other elements conspire to take away from the harvest for which we worked so hard to produce. Despite the best application of modern agricultural practices, an unavoidable portion of what is grown rots in the fields prior to harvest time, or in the world’s storage bins afterwards. Every year, depending upon geographic location and intensity of El Niño events, crops suffer from too little water and wither on the spot, or are lost to severe flooding, hailstorms, tornados, earthquakes, hurricanes, cyclones, fires, and other destructive events of nature. Many of these phenomena are at best difficult to predict, and at worst are impossible to react to in time to prevent the losses associated with them. In sub-Saharan Africa, locusts remain an ever-present threat (42), and can devastate vast areas of farmland in a matter of days. Even after a bumper crop is realized, problems associated with processing and storage lessen the actual tonnage that is available to the consumer. A large portion of the harvest, regardless of the kind of plant or grain, is despoiled or a portion consumed by a variety of opportunistic life forms (., fungi, bacteria, insects, rodents) after being stored. While it is conceded that at present the abundance of cash crops is more than sufficient to meet the nutritional needs of the world’s human population, delivering them to world markets is driven largely by economics, not biological need. Thus, the poorest people – some billion – are forced to live in a constant state of starvation (43), with many thousands of deaths per year attributable to this wholly preventable predicament (44). Locating vertical farms near these human “hot spots” would greatly alleviate this problem.

Essay on watershed management

essay on watershed management

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